travelingcolors:

Giant Barbie Wave (by Annette Thas) 

Towering over 9 feet above the surface of Cottesloe Beach’s pristine sand in Perth, Australia, is the monumental sculptural installation by Belgian artist Annette Thas‘Wave 1′, created for the 2014 Sculpture by the Sea, is intricately crafted from over 3,000 barbie dolls, collected from various second-hand shops — a symbol of the personal stories of every doll’s former owner. Inspired by her own childhood memories and emotional reminders of her youth, Thas wanted to find a way to universally represent the precious and short period of time through the piece.

(continue reading)

My Favorite Disney villains

What about Ursula ?

(via vintagegal)

Sent my designs to Fabpad. Oh lala it’s like waiting for Santa Claus to come. Exciting moment ! Aaaaah

Sent my designs to Fabpad. Oh lala it’s like waiting for Santa Claus to come. Exciting moment ! Aaaaah


The Addams Family

The Addams Family

(via vintagegal)

wgsn:

We love this layered, cocooning knit look from @Barbara_Bui - perfect winter whites #pfw 

Knitted garments are everything

wgsn:

We love this layered, cocooning knit look from @Barbara_Bui - perfect winter whites #pfw 

Knitted garments are everything

golikpavel:

the sartorialist by me 

Gorgeous creature

golikpavel:

the sartorialist by me 

Gorgeous creature

science-junkie:

underthevastblueseas:

Ocean acidification is sometimes called “climate change’s evil twin,” and for good reason: it’s a significant and harmful consequence of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that we don’t see or feel because its effects are happening underwater. At least one-quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released by burning coal, oil and gas doesn’t stay in the air, but instead dissolves into the ocean. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the ocean has absorbed some 525 billion tons of CO2 from the atmosphere, presently around 22 million tons per day.

At first, scientists thought that this might be a good thing because it leaves less carbon dioxide in the air to warm the planet. But in the past decade, they’ve realized that this slowed warming has come at the cost of changing the ocean’s chemistry. When carbon dioxide dissolves in seawater, the water becomes more acidic and the ocean’s pH (a measure of how acidic or basic the ocean is) drops. Even though the ocean is immense, enough carbon dioxide can have a major impact. In the past 200 years alone, ocean water has become 30 percent more acidic—faster than any known change in ocean chemistry in the last 50 million years.

Read More

science-junkie:

We’re often told they are ‘bad for us’ - but what, if any, positive effects do video games have on your brain? Can they actually make you smarter?

" :D "

Listen some good latin music during the making of my business card.

Caliente ! caliente “

First drawing of 2014

First drawing of 2014

Inspiration from banging holidays.